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Django 1.0 released!

No, you’re not hallucinating, it’s really here.

Around three years ago, Adrian, Simon, Wilson and I released some code to the world. Our plan was to hack quietly on it for a bit, release a solid 1.0 release, and then really get the ball rolling.

Well.

What happened, of course, was that an amazing community sprung up literally overnight — our IRC channel had over a hundred people in it the day after release, and it’s never been that “empty” since.

I really can’t stress enough how amazing our community of users and developers are. About half of the code that’s gone into Django over the past three years has been contributed by someone other than a core committer. Since our last stable release, we’ve made over 4,000 code commits, fixed more than 2,000 bugs, and edited, added, or removed around 350,000 lines of code. We’ve also added 40,000 lines of new documentation, and greatly improved what was already there.

Django 1.0 represents a the largest milestone in Django’s development to date: a web framework that a group of perfectionists can truly be proud of. Without this amazing community, though, it would have never happened.

You can download Django 1.0 on the Django downloads page, and read the complete release notes.

For distributors and for verification purposes, a file containing the MD5 and SHA1 checksums of the 1.0 package has been placed on the djangoproject.com server. This file is PGP-signed with the Django release manager’s public key. This key has the ID 0x8C8B2AE1 and can be obtained from, e.g., the MIT PGP keyserver.

Posted by Jacob Kaplan-Moss on September 3, 2008