Weblog

March archive

Django 1.4 released

March 23, 2012

It's here!

After many months of work, we're proud to announce the release today of Django 1.4. There's plenty of cool stuff in this release, and the release notes cover it all in detail. You can also swing by the downloads page to grab a copy of the release package. And as always, signed checksums for the release package are available.

One important point is worth mentioning here, however: Django 1.4 is, as covered in the release notes, the last official release of Django which will support Python 2.5. When Django 1.5 is released, the minimum Python version required will be 2.6 (see this recent post for some more details on what that means), though you'll still be able to use Django 1.4 -- during its security support lifecycle -- if you need Python 2.5 support.

Finally, we'd like to point out, as always, that we couldn't do this without the help of the huge numbers of people all around the world who contribute to and improve Django every single day. All of you should give yourselves a big pat on the back.

Django 1.4 release candidate 2 issued

March 14, 2012

As part of the updated Django 1.4 release process, today we've issued Django 1.4 release candidate 2, which will hopefully be the final pre-release package before Django 1.4.

Because this is a pre-release package, it is of course not recommended for production use, but if you'd like to try it out in a safe environment and help spot any remaining bugs before 1.4 final, feel free to grab a copy and give it a spin.

You can get a copy of the 1.4 release candidate from our downloads page, and we recommend you read the release notes. The most important note there is that Django 1.4 drops support for Python 2.4; to run the release candidate you'll need at least Python 2.5. Also, for the security conscious, signed MD5 and SHA1 checksums of the 1.4 release candidate package are available.

If you spot serious bugs that could block the release of Django 1.4, please head over to our Trac instance, look to see if a ticket has already been filed, and if not open a new one.

At present, two bugs are known which will be fixed prior to release, but which are minor enough that we've felt issuing this release candidate is appropriate. Those are tracked by tickets 17758 and 17838.

If no show-stopping bugs are reported within the next seven days, we'll move ahead and issue the Django 1.4 release next week.

Django's future, and Python 3

March 13, 2012

With Django 1.4 so close to release, it's also time to start talking about Django 1.5. Not many details have been finalized, but one very important announcement was made Sunday during the PyCon lightning talks session.

Perhaps the most common question about Django's future, for some time now, has been "when will Django support Python 3?" The answer is that porting code is relatively straightforward, but migrating a community the size of Django, with a large install base running on a variety of platforms, is rather complex. Following the recommendations of the Python team, our goal has been first to deprecate older 2.x releases until our minimum requirement is Python 2.6, then to take advantage of the compatibility features in 2.6 to carry out the actual porting and achieve Python 3 support.

Django 1.4 will drop our support for Python 2.4, establishing a minimum requirement of 2.5. Django 1.5 will then drop Python 2.5 support, setting the minimum at 2.6. Additionally, Django 1.5 will begin the process of porting the codebase, and will -- through the 2/3 compatibility features in Python 2.6 and 2.7 -- experimentally support Python 3 (we hope to be targeting up to Python 3.3, which is expected to be released in roughly the same time frame as Django 1.5).

The full details of that porting process and the level of support (i.e., whether Python 3 incompatibilities will become blocking bugs much as incompatibilities with alternate implementations like PyPy already are) are still being worked on, but Python 3 is the future of the Python language, and in support of that the Django project is and will remain committed to achieving Python 3 compatibility.

Django 1.4 update

March 13, 2012

Last week, we issued a release candidate for Django 1.4. Since then, many of the committers have been at PyCon US in Santa Clara, and we've been taking part in the post-conference sprints. At the moment, the queue of release-blocking tickets stands at 10; some of those are release-process issues which will get closed as part of rolling the release, but a couple still need to get in before 1.4 final is issued. Additionally, a look at the development timeline shows that the sprints have been busy -- over 30 commits in the past couple of days.

Given the amount of activity and the last couple of lingering blockers, we're going to hold the 1.4 final release a bit longer for some final shaking-out. The revised release process now looks like this:

  • Wednesday, March 14, 2012: We will issue Django 1.4 release candidate 2. This will be accompanied by a renewed call for final testing.
  • If no release-blocking bugs are reported with the second release candidate, Django 1.4 will be released approximately one week later.

DjangoCon Europe 2012 tickets on sale and call for papers

March 5, 2012

The DjangoCon Europe 2012 team is happy to announce the immediate availability of ticket sales for DjangoCon Europe 2012 in Europe. At the same time, the call for papers is now open, so please submit your talk proposals.

For more information, please read the announcement on the DjangoCon Europe website.

Django 1.4 release candidate issued

March 5, 2012

As part of the Django 1.4 release process, today we've issued Django 1.4 release candidate 1, which will hopefully be the final pre-release package before Django 1.4 goes final.

Because this is a pre-release package, it is of course not recommended for production use, but if you'd like to try it out in a safe environment and help spot any remaining bugs before 1.4 final, feel free to grab a copy and give it a spin.

You can get a copy of the 1.4 release candidate from our downloads page, and we recommend you read the release notes. The most important note there is that Django 1.4 drops support for Python 2.4; to run the release candidate you'll need at least Python 2.5. Also, for the security conscious, signed MD5 and SHA1 checksums of the 1.4 release candidate package are available.

If you spot serious bugs that could block the release of Django 1.4, please head over to our Trac instance, look to see if a ticket has already been filed, and if not open a new one.

If no show-stopping bugs are reported within the next seven days, we'll move ahead and issue the Django 1.4 release early next week from sunny Santa Clara, California, where most of the Django crew will be hanging out at PyCon.